Argentina Arts

Argentina Arts

Argentina does not present artistic forms of great importance in indigenous cultures. Sculpture on wood or stone is not very common and the clay art is very modest, with the exception of that of the NW Argentine diaghites, who also distinguished themselves in the field of metallurgy, glyptics and modeled, painted or engraved ceramics. which in the other groups is only a product of high craftsmanship. Worthy of note are the pictographs on the rock, which represent war scenes (NW Argentina, central sierras), animal tracks (Cuyo area) or negative handprints (Patagonia). The first colonial buildings were promoted by the religious orders. In addition to the missions in the interior of the country (the most important was that of San Ignacio Miní, a model of urban planning, whose ruins are located in the border area with Paraguay) the Jesuits built churches and convents of Baroque style in every city. The major architect of the Company, the father, was active in Buenos Aires Andrés Blanqui (churches of the Pilar, 1732; de La Merced, of Las Catalinas), also author of the cathedral of Córdoba, the church of Alta Gracia and the Jesuit estancia of Jesús María. The masterpiece of Argentine colonial architecture is the church of the Society of Jesus in Córdoba, the work of fathers Cardonosa and Lemer, with a remarkable wooden “hull” roof. In the nineteenth century, a type of private house was spontaneously developed, both in the city and in the countryside, with white walls, with only the ground floor or a mezzanine floor, with a series of patios and covered galleries, closed by a wrought iron gate. Towards the middle of the century, the European taste, especially thanks to the Italian immigrants, led to the addition of neoclassical decorative elements, while maintaining their traditional sobriety. This spontaneous style was opposed by an intellectual current promoted by wealthy professionals who traveled to Europe and had the house built on the design of French architects. In painting, however, the influence of European art predominated in an absolute way, known directly by the artists who went to study in Paris and Italy. The major personality of this period was Prilidiano Pueyrredón (1823-1870), author of portraits, landscapes and genre scenes. At the beginning of the twentieth century, almost all the public buildings in the country were built. In Buenos Aires worked V. Meano, Italian architect, author of the Congress building and the Colón theater. Around the 1920s, a revival of colonial architecture with Martín Noel (Argentine pavilion at the Seville exhibition), while avant-garde architecture later established itself with the architect Virasoro and the Prebich brothers. Contemporary architecture is based on purely utilitarian criteria. Among the painters Alfredo Guttero and Emilio Pettoruti stood out, the latter trained in Italy with the Futurists, and returning to Argentina in 1924 was a master of a whole generation. Of a type of Fauvian paintingwas instead exponent Miguel C. Victorica (1884-1955); Rodin’s follower was Rogelio Yrurtia (1879-1950), author of numerous monuments in the squares of Buenos Aires. Among the other excellent names of nineteenth-twentieth-century sculpture are Lucio Correa Morales (1852-1923), Antonio Pujia, Lola Mora (1866-1936). After the Second World War, one of the most significant personalities is that of Julio Le Parc who, developing the premises already contained in Lucio Fontana’s Manifiesto Blanco (1946) (an artist of Argentine origin), gave birth to the movement for concrete art (Arturo was the reference magazine in Argentina, a country of South America defined by softwareleverage, org). In 1946 the Madí movement was also born, to which the activity of Gyula Kosice and others is linked; influential painters of the Argentine twentieth century were also Raúl Soldi (1905-1994), Benito Quinquela Martín (1890-1977), Antonio Berni (1905-1981), with his works with a strong social charge, Guillermo Kuitca, Carlos Alonso (b. 1929). In subsequent years, painting is represented by the artists of the “New Figuration” group and by the followers of geometric abstractionism (Eduardo McEntyre), among whom some (such as Manuel Espinosa) have oriented themselves to the experiences of op art. The art of the end of the century has definitively consecrated the creations of León Ferrari (1920-2013), Leone d’Oro at the Venice Biennale in 2007, Remo Bianchedi (b.1950), trained in Europe, and Aníbal Cedrón (b.1948). Among the most recent “discoveries” are Andrea Broggi and Bea Diez, both born in 1966, Jorge Alio, Alejandro Marmo, who uses iron and disused objects, Florencia Wagner, and the sculptors Rubén Grau (b. 1959) and Gloria Argelés (b.1940).

Argentina Arts